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As an Orthodontist, I specialize in the treatment of malocclusions (bad bites and crooked teeth). I suggest you contact a general dentist or a specialist for your area of concern.




Some orthodontists offer lingual braces ("behind the teeth"). I do not use lingual braces in my practice, instead for patients who are concerned about asthetics, I offer clear ceramic braces. A number of insurance plans do cover orthodontics today.




This question is more appropriate for a general dentist. While Orthodontists must first earn a degree in denistry, we specialize in treating patients with abnormal growth patterns and improper bites. We do not utilize crowns and posts in the practice orthodontics.




Call the American Association of Orthodontists at (314) 993-1700 or visit their web site at www.aaortho.org or e-mail the association at info@aaortho.com. They have a listing of all member orthodontists. First, I would encourage you to talk to your orthodontist about your concerns. If you still have questions or concerns get a second opinion from another orthodontist in your area.




To find an Orthodontist in your area you can either check the yellow pages or visit the American Association of Orthodontists web site at www.aaortho.org The only way to know which Orthodontists will accept medicaid is to call their office on the phone and ask. The office manager or front desk person should be able to answer this question for you. Good luck!




Typically an Orthodontist must complete the following: Four years of undergraduate study, (bachelors degree) Three years of dental school (Doctor degree) Two years of residency. Total of nine to ten years of higher education.




As an Orthodontist, I specialize in the treatment of malocclusions (bad bites and crooked teeth). I suggest you contact a general dentist or a TMJ specialist for your concerns.




As an Orthodontist, I specialize in the treatment of malocclusions (bad bites and crooked teeth). I suggest you contact a general dentist or a TMJ specialist for your concern.




Although I cannot diagnose a patient with seeing him/her, in general at age 12 expansion can be accomplished with a non-surgical approach. Another factor to consider is the severity of the problem and how much expansion is required. If a child of 12 has a disproportionately large lower jaw sometimes a trial non-surgical approach is recommended. Lower jaw growth usually continues until the bodily growth is complete. So if the patient has surgery at 12 years of age, he/she could outgrow his/her treatment. Talk to the orthodontist about your concerns. If you still don?t feel comfortable with his/her advice, get a second opinion.




1) Class III malocclusions are very difficult to correct. If the discrepancy between the upper and lower jaw is too great, jaw surgery in combination with orthodontics is required to achieve a correction. Consequently, children in the 7 to 9 year range who demonstrate class III growth are frequently treated to re-direct this unfavorable growth. I treat each patient individually addressing their specific circumstances. Sometimes I do begin treatment at 7 years of age. 2) While I can't diagnose a patient without seeing him/her, generally the space for the permanent teeth in front of the first permanent molars has been determined as soon as these molars erupt. There are appliances available to expand the dental arches to some extent. Although all orthodontists have similar goals for the patient, the method of achieving those goals can vary from orthodontist to orthodontist. Sometimes there can be a significant variance in the treatment plan.



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