Sharon Stone Shares Botched Cosmetic Procedure Experience

Hundreds of celebrities choose to go under the knife each year, improving their appearance with popular procedures including Botox, liposuction, breast implants and tummy tucks.

However, not all procedures go smoothly, and many a celebrity has been put under the media spotlight to serve as an example of plastic surgery gone bad. Sharon Stone recently interviewed with More Magazine, and admitted that she had cosmetic surgery that ended up making her look “like a trout.”

The 52-year-old actress told Phil Bronstein, an editor of the San Francisco newspaper, that she began to feel insecure about her appearance after her divorce in 2004. She tells More Magazine, that “Nobody loves me. I’m 103. My life would be better if I had better lips.” The actress underwent lip augmentation surgery as a result, and her lips ended up becoming excessively large and unshapely. She admits that the procedure was done in her ‘moment of weakness’ and that she promises never to get plastic surgery again because the procedure made her look ‘like a trout.’

Botched procedures are nothing new, even for celebrities. Stars including Heidi Montag, Joan Rivers, Bruce Jenner, Dolly Parton and Donatella Versace have all been criticized and ridiculed about their cosmetic surgery makeovers in recent years, and some even serve as a poster child for bad plastic surgery. While some plastic surgeons can perform reversal procedures, some celebs just aren’t that lucky. In many cases, the botched procedure means the celebrity needs to spend a significant amount of time recovering while nature takes its course, or undergo a completely different procedure to correct and modify the results of the previous one.

In spite of the risks involved, celebrities and the average consumer alike are still making their way to the plastic surgery office for liposuction, Botox, breast implants and other procedures. As the economy recovers, many consumers are ready to make the investment for plastic and cosmetic surgery procedures – even with the inherent risks involved.

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