Lockheed Martin Partners with UCLA to Help Wounded Warriors

Lockheed Martin has pledged $4 million to benefit the UCLA Health System’s Mend program, which provides plastic and reconstructive surgeries for military personnel that have been wounded in Iraq and Afghanistan.

The donation will be used for two major purposes: to improve the patient’s experience when the individual is undergoing multiple surgeries, and to fund the renovation of the surgical area and make improvements as part of the Ambulatory Surgical Center Enhancement Project at UCLA. The funds will be used to create more private patient recovery suites so that family members and friends can visit the patient, and the patient enjoys more privacy.

Robert J. Stevens, chairman of the board and CEO of Lockheed Martin states, “Lockheed Martin is proud to partner with UCLA on the important work Operation Mend is doing to provide life-changing surgeries to military members who have been severely injured while serving our country…we recognize that the sacrifices of our servicemen and women sometimes results in debilitating personal injury, and we are honored to help make a difference in those lives.”

After their surgery, patients who are part of the Operation Mend program will be moved to one of the private recovery suites where post-operative surgeons and nurses can monitor their heart rate, temperature and blood pressure. Visitors will be permitted to enter this area after the anesthesia has worn off. Most patients require inpatient and outpatient services that cost about $500,000 per individual. The corporate gift will help the referring centers and the hospital better manage costs and allocate more resources to enhancing the physical surroundings of the patient care centers.

Operation Mend programs include facial reconstructive surgery, post-traumatic stress and traumatic brain injuries, and clinical services, including dermatology, neurology, pain management and orthopedic care. All services are provided at no cost to the patient, and families and friends visiting the patient stay at UCLA’s Tiverton House hotel.

Further Reading