Fraxel Re:Store Can Treat Precancerous Skin Conditions

Many people with moles, age spots and lesions undergo chemical peels, skin resurfacing procedures and microdermabrasion to help reduce the appearance of these marks and keep the skin healthy.

Unfortunately, some of these blemishes and lesions can be cancerous, and require intervention by a professional dermatologist. Dermatologists now have more options than ever for treating precancerous skin conditions, and many are turning to the Fraxel Re:Store system to achieve exceptional results.

Solta Medical, the medical aesthetics manufacturer behind Fraxel, recently announced that its Re:Stor DUAL laser system can provide superior results as  treatment for actinic keratoses, a precancerous skin condition caused by excessive sun exposure.

A clinical study at a laser and dermatology office in New York shows that the Fraxel Re:Stor DUAL laser was able to resolve over 85 percent of all AK lesions, and also helped to improve the texture and tone of the skin. Dr. Roy Geronemus, director of the Laser & Skin Surgery Center of New York, states, “if one already has significant sun damage, as can be the case with active golfers, I recommend the new Fraxel re:store DUAL laser treatment…the (treatment) is comparable or better to other topical therapies; however Fraxel has the added benefit of improving skin quality, color and texture.” (Source:

In 2008, Fraxel’s family of laser systems was presented during the American Society for Laser Medicine and Surgery’s annual conference, and highlighted the effects of the Fraxel Re:Pair, Re:Store and Re:Fine laser systems, which have now become the gold standard for fractional skin treatments.

The Re:Store laser was introduced to the United States market in 2004,  and is currently available at over 1,500 dermatology, plastic surgery and aesthetic surgery offices around the world. The procedure can be administered to the face, neck, chest, and hands, and is suitable for almost all skin types.

Further Reading

  • Up until now, dermatologists have been trying a variety of different skin removal techniques to get rid of precancerous skin lesions.

  • Topical agents, diet and certain medicines presented at the American Academy of Dermatology’s Summer Academy Meeting 2010 in Chicago is showing promise for preventing UV-induced skin cancer. Most skin cancers are caused by overexposure to ultraviolet radiation, and dermatologists are now encouraging the public to be conscientious about the amount of sun they are exposed to, and taking extra steps to use broad-spectrum sunscreen on a regular basis.

  • Individuals with a rare skin disease called recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB) can improve their condition with the transfer of bone marrow stem cells. A team of medical researchers has found that bone marrow stem cells can effectively treat the disease and help to repair the skin and speed up the healing process. This skin disease cannot be treated with conventional dermatology procedures.