Alicia Duvall Admits She's Addicted to Cosmetic Surgery

Silicone implants, plumped up lips, arm lifts, and tummy tucks are some of the most coveted cosmetic and plastic surgery procedures around the globe, but for many, the coveting turns into a full-fledged addiction.  Alicia Douvall, an English model and reality TV star who's been spotted on the red carpet in both the UK and overseas, has recently admitted to a cosmetic surgery addiction.  She's one of several celebrities who become trapped in an addictive cycle of fixing every physical defect, real or perceived.

A recent interview with the UK's Independent provides some insights on this obsession:

"Douvall isn't dependent on cocaine, alcohol, painkillers, or any of the other substances that traditionally lead to a celebrity's downfall. Instead, she suffers an unlikely obsession: she is addicted to cosmetic surgery. "I've had so many operations that I can't feel my stomach, my left breast, or anything under my right arm," says Douvall, who first went under the knife as a teenager." (Source: The Independent)

Douvall is not only addicted to undergoing the latest procedure, but also suffers from body dysmorphic disorder (BDD), a type of obsessive compulsive disorder where the person perceives that they are ugly - and will do everything they can to change themselves.  Unfortunately, their perception rarely changes with their physical appearance.

BDD sufferers often suffer from extremely low self-esteem, and may take extreme measures to change their appearance.  Many turn to extreme bodybuilding, compulsive exercising, or undergo several cosmetic procedures as a  'solution' for their problem.

Alicia Douvall admits that she's become addicted to cosmetic and plastic surgery, and has already had over 100 procedures; Douvall is just 29 years old.  After spending several weeks at the Passages Addiction Centre in Malibu to pursue recovery, she is now starring in a reality TV show 'Rehab'.  The show follows seven celebrities who are trapped in an addiction, and have agreed to undergo therapy.

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