Titanium Coated Implants May Be Breast Enhancement Procedure of the Future

Silicone and saline breast implants continue to be top choices for breast augmentation procedures in the United States, but many surgeons around the globe are experimenting with innovative materials and alternatives to traditional implants in hopes of creating more natural-looking breasts that also render fewer complications.

Currently, breast implants that make use of silicone or saline are inserted into the body to adhere to the surrounding tissues; over time, the body 'adapts' these foreign materials as its own and produces collagen and elastin fibers around them.  However, many patients experience a significant number of inflammatory reactions from the procedure when the body detects the foreign matter is present under the skin.

Researchers at Medical Vision Australia in Hackney, South Australia are conducting trials on titanium-coated breast implants that may be more 'acceptable' by the body, and present fewer side effects and complications as a result.  Since titanium is already present in the body, the body may not react to the implants as if it were a toxic material and therefore adapt better to the implants.

During the adaptation process, the body produces excess collagen to connect the natural tissues to the implant.  Researchers suggest that the titanium coating will improve 'collagen maturity' which then results in smoother, more natural-looking breasts.

The idea is still relatively new and is undergoing comprehensive research as more surgeons explore new ways to create healthy-looking and natural breasts.

Cosmetic Surgery Times reports that Stan Raci, Managing Director of MVA is still unsure how valuable this procedure may be; "titanium-coated silicone breast implants are currently in "clinical trial and we don't as yet have a full report on what the likely outcome will be. As much as we are very enthusiastic and very positive that this technology could make huge changes to women in the future, we cannot say that with any long-term authority at this point."

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