Nose Job (Rhinoplasty) Questions and Answers Archive

Jul
1999

Q&A: What are my options outside of surgery for a herniated S1 disc and degenerative joint disease in the L5?

Question:

Im a competitive strongman athlete. I have been out of the gym for several weeks now. Recently I was diagnosed with spondylolysis and a herniated disc. The spondylolysis is on the L5 bilaterally. The herniated disc is at S1. What is the best course of action for me to take so I can ensure quick and 100% full recovery? My doc is suggesting surgery but I wasnt wanting to go that rout. Thank you for you help!

- Kyle

Answer:

Spondylosis is another name for degenerative joint disease or Osteoarthritis. This is a fairly common thing as people get older. I dont know your age, but I am guessing you are at least in your 30s. The disc can also become affected just like in your case. Unfortunately the L5 S1 disc that is herniated will never be 100% again. If you are experiencing neurological problems such as radiating pain or severe leg spasms, then you may need to consult an Orthopedic surgeon. However Chiropractors have great success with this type of problem. I am living proof. I also have a disc herniation that was helped by Chiropractic. Give chiropractic and their treatment a chance, then if no relief consult a surgeon. If you are in NJ look me up.

-- Michael Carbo, DC
Florham Park, New Jersey



Jun
1999

Q&A: Is my 3 year old daughter too young to have surgery for open bite and how do I find info on Lefort I Osteotomy?

Question:

Dear Dr., My 3 year old daughter has an open bite. We have been reffered to an oral surgeon and told that surgery would be required. Are these procedures usually preformed on children of this age and if so, how does this affect future bone growth and development? Also, could you help me find more information about Le Fort I osteotomy on the web to help us better understand this procedure?

- Anna

Answer:

The correction of an open bite is often done with a Lefort I osteotomy. The majority of the patients that undergo this procedure are older than 15 years old enless they have been diagnosed with a facial syndrome that requires a staged surgical correction. In these patients the final effects on overal growth and developement is unclear because of their underlying condition. For this reason I would be perfectly clear about your childs long term treatment plans as well as the primary diagnosis. Once you know this information you will be able to make a much better decision. For additional information about Lefort I osteotomies I would reccommend researching these key words on the web and at your local public library. Orthognathic surgery Craniofacial surgery Jaw corrective surgery good luck

--Priveer Sharma, D.M.D.
Winter Park, Florida



Mar
1999

Q&A: What type of doctor do I meed to see if I have endometriosis and might need laparoscopic surgery?

Question:

I am having trouble finding a OBGYN. I was diagnosed with endometriosis and might need Laparospic surgery. I found one who seems good. He is a member of the Amer. Assoc. of Gyno. Laparoscopists and Society for Endoscopy. Plus other things, but he is not board certified and doesn't have a FACOG after his name. Is this the right Doctor for me. What does FACOG mean anyway?

- Venita

Answer:

Daniel Potter, MD, FACOG - LocateADoc.com

FACOG mean Fellow of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. One must be certified by the American Board of Obstetricians and Gynecologists before becoming a Fellow. There are two steps to board certification. The first is passing the written exam. This is generally done at the completion of residency. The candidate then must practice for two years. A case list is then submitted to the board. IF accepted, the candidate then may take the oral exam. Passing the oral exam makes them a Diplomate of the ABOG and qualifies them for FACOG. MDs who are have recently finished their training may not yet have taken the oral part of the board. They are what is referred to as "board eligible". Membership in the AAGL and SE does not require competency testing. THis said, your MD may be a great laparoscopist and excellent physican. Try to speak to people in the community (especially former patients) about his reputation. FACOG also does not = excellence in laparoscopy. Good luck.

--Daniel Potter, MD, FACOG
Fullerton, California