LASIK Eye Surgery Questions and Answers Archive

Nov
2001

Q&A: Are diabetics excluded from LASIK surgery?

Question:

ARE DIABETICS EXCLUDED FROM LASIK SURGERY

- JANICE

Answer:

 Andrew Caster, MD, FACS - LocateADoc.com

If the diabetes is under very good control, and if there is not extensive retinal damamge from the diabetes, then a person with diabetes can have LASIK. Andrew Caster, MD

-- Andrew Caster, MD, FACS
Beverly Hills, California



Nov
2001

Q&A: Is it true that if I have LASIK eye surgery I will need reading glasses, which I don't need now?

Question:

Is it true if I have Lasik surgery I will need reading glasses, which I don't need now?

- A..B.

Answer 1:

Richard W Lomas, M.D. - LocateADoc.com

If you currently take your glasses off to read, wear monovision contact lenses, or bifocals...options that most people over 40 must use...then you will likely need reading glasses after LASIK, which provides vision similar to that of your distance glasses or contacts. The lens inside the eye loses the ability to change focus as we grow older. This condition is called presbyopia, a Latin term that literally means "old eyes". It is a normal condition that happens to us all, and we expect to have a surgical treatment for it in the not too distant future.

--Richard W Lomas, M.D.
Renton, Washington

Answer 2:

David B. Cano, M.D. - LocateADoc.com

Yes, it is possible that you may need reading glasses if you are corrected for your distance vision and are over the age of 40. This is because of presbyopia that worsens in everyone as they age. You may want to consider having one eye treated less than the other to have monovision. Have your ophthalmologist discuss this option with you if you are a can

--David B. Cano, M.D.
West Palm Beach, Florida



Oct
2001

Q&A: After LASIK eye surgery a month ago, will seeing shadows above objects at a distance go away?

Question:

I had lasik surgery a month ago and I am seeing a shadow above objects. My close up vision is okay but its the farther away objects that have this shadow. An example is when a car is coming at me at a quarter of a mile or so it has an additional set of headlights and it looks almost like a police cars light-bar on top. Will this go away in time? I've asked my follow-up doctor and he doesn't seem to know.

- Jennifer

Answer:

Andrew Caster, MD, FACS - LocateADoc.com

Most likely, this will go away. However, you should be getting more useable answers from your follow-up doctor. Andrew Caster, MD

--Andrew Caster, MD, FACS
Beverly Hills, California



Oct
2001

Q&A: What is the range of thickness a cornea must fall between in order for an eye to qualify for LASIK as opposed to PRK?

Question:

What is the range of thickness a cornea must fall between in order for an eye to qualify for Lasik as opposed to PRK? (I recently had my eyes examined to see if I qualified for Lasik but was told my cornea was to thin and I would therefore have to have PRK).

- Lawrence

Answer:

Andrew Caster, MD, FACS - LocateADoc.com

The rule that is followed by almost everyone is to leave 250 microns untouched. Since, with current technology, the thinnest flaps are 160, that would mean a thickness of 410 microns plus the amount removed by the laser, which varies with your pupil size and degree of myopia/astigmatism. Andrew Caster, MD

--Andrew Caster, MD, FACS
Beverly Hills, California



Oct
2001

Q&A: After my first appointment, I was told everything looks good for the Lasik procedure, but I may not be a canadate for enhancements because my corneas were to thin. Is this a cause for concern for the Lasik procedure in the first place?

Question:

After my first appointment, I was told everything looks good for the Lasik procedure, but I may not be a canadate for enhancements because my cornias were to thin. Is this a cause for concern for the Lasik procedure in the first place?

- John

Answer 1:

Andrew Caster, MD, FACS - LocateADoc.com

Since anywhere from 5-35% of patients need enhancements, I would consider holding off on Lasik at this time. Hopefully in the future, there will be treatments for thin corneas that will still allow you to have an enhancement. Andrew Caster, MD www.castervision.com

--Andrew Caster, MD, FACS
Beverly Hills, California

Answer 2:

David B. Cano, M.D. - LocateADoc.com

You may want to consider LASEK or PRK instead as an option.

--David B. Cano, M.D.
West Palm Beach, Florida



Oct
2001

Q&A: How can LASIK eye surgery be justified as a medical necessity and not be just cosmetic?

Question:

How can Lasik surgery technique be justified as a medical necissity and not be just cosmetic?

- Richard

Answer:

Andrew Caster, MD, FACS - LocateADoc.com

Each insurance company has its own policy regarding LASIK. Most avod the question of medical necessity by simply saying that LASIK treatment is excluded from coverage. Andrew Caster, MD

--Andrew Caster, MD, FACS
Beverly Hills, California



Sep
2001

Q&A: Can LASEK eye surgery cause cataracts?

Question:

Dear Dr., I had Lasek surgery less than a year ago. I would like to know if Lasek surgery can cause cataracts? I am 55 years old. Any information or direction would be greatly appreciated. Thank you.

- James

Answer:

Andrew Caster, MD, FACS - LocateADoc.com

LASIK, LASEK, and PRK do not cause cataracts. Andrew Caster, MD

--Andrew Caster, MD, FACS
Beverly Hills, California



Sep
2001

Q&A: Has anyone heard of LASEK? I had this procedure done March of this year and it is wonderful.

Question:

Has anyone heard of LASEK? I had this procedure done March of this year. I was wearing -7's (contacts) in both my eyes and standard LASIK was not a good option for me. I had very thin corneas. Dr. Yee of Herman Eye Center is performing LASEK on patients with thin corneas and it is virtually painless - at least in my case. He makes a flap out of your epithelium which is a lot safer and painless like I said. Even his patients that are candidates for standard LASIK are choosing to do LASEK because of the low risk of injury to your corneal tisssue. He is currently co-authoring with other doctors over seas about this procedure and to my knowledge is the only doctor in Houston and possibly the US performing this procedure. I am six months out and seeing 20/15. It is wonderful.

- Maria

Answer 1:

Andrew Caster, MD, FACS - LocateADoc.com

It is great to hear your experience. I recommend and perform LASEK on people who are not good candidates for LASIK, such as people with thin corneas. Although the healing period is much longer than LASIK, it is an excellent alternative. Andrew Caster, MD Beverly Hills, CA

--Andrew Caster, MD, FACS
Beverly Hills, California

Answer 2:

David B. Cano, M.D. - LocateADoc.com

Dear Maria, LASEK (Laser assisted seu-epithelial keratectomy) as it is called has been aroung for several years and has become more popular in the United States recently. It is basically a version of PRK (Photorefractive Keratectomy) which I have been doing since 1994. I have done LASEK on similar cases like yours with great results (In fact, I believe that I am one of the first to do this procedure in the Palm Beaches). It has several advantages over LASIK in that you can treat thinner cornea. The corneal nerve regeneration is quicker. There are NO corneal flap complications that we all hear so much about. On the down side is the fact that you need to be on drops for a longer time, vision stays blurry for about one to two weeks. A bandage contact lense is used and pain is often greater. There is also a higher amount of haze in some patients, but this usually does noty affect vision and often goes away. The procedure basically is like PRK, but you spare the epithelium and remove it as a sheet after cutting it with a shallow trephine ring and 20% alcohol to help loosen this layer. This allows you to do the treatment directly on the cornea and replace the epithelium and place a bandage contact lens for 4 days. Drops are often need for at least a month unlike LASIK which is usually about 4-5 days. The advancement of newer lasers with smoother profiles and scanning lasers with trackers has made this a great and safe option for laser vision correction in many people. In fact some surgeons offer LASEK as the only procedure. I currently offer both procedures, but will do LASEK on a patient with thinner corneas. Thanks for your insight and comments on your successful procedure. David B. Cano,

--David B. Cano, M.D.
West Palm Beach, Florida