LASIK Eye Surgery Questions and Answers Archive

Dec
2001

Q&A: Am I a candidate for LASIK eye surgery if I am very nearsighted (13) and have astigmatism?

Question:

I am considering lasik, but I am concerned if I am a candidate or not. I have astigmatism in both eyes and am very near sighted. I think my vision is a 13 in both eyes. I have worn hard contacts for three years now. How long would I have to go without my contacts? How much correction could I realisticly expect?

- Kristy

Answer:

 Andrew Caster, MD, FACS - LocateADoc.com

With your prescription, you may or may not be a candidate, depending on several factors. You should obtain an opinion from a qualified surgeon. Andrew caster, MD

-- Andrew Caster, MD, FACS
Beverly Hills, California



Dec
2001

Q&A: My vision is Right -25 with -75 with ax 142; Left -0 with 075 by 30. Would I be a good candidate for Lasik?

Question:

If my vision is as follows would I be a good candidate for Lasik? Right -25 with -75 with ax 142; Left -0 with 075 by 30. I'm told my vision isn't bad but I do need to wear glasses so I don't get eye strain which leads to headaches.

- gayle

Answer:

Andrew Caster, MD, FACS - LocateADoc.com

Although you have a low prescription, if it is bad enough to require you to use glasses then it is bad enough to fix with LASIK. Andrew Caster, MD

--Andrew Caster, MD, FACS
Beverly Hills, California



Dec
2001

Q&A: I have a crossed eye and I am farsighted. Can my vision and crossed eye be corrected?

Question:

I have amblyopia, strabismus with a turned in eye (esotropia) and I am farsighted. I didn't have proper treatment as a child and I am now 27. Can my vision be corrected through surgery? Even if my vision is unable to be corrected can my crossed eye be corrected?

- Jody

Answer:

Andrew Caster, MD, FACS - LocateADoc.com

Your crossed eye can be straightened. However, lasik is probably not recommended, unless the amblyopia is extremely mild. Andrew Caster, MD

--Andrew Caster, MD, FACS
Beverly Hills, California



Dec
2001

Q&A: I currently wear monovision contacts. Can LASIK achieve monovision?

Question:

I currently wear "mono-vision" contacts, meaning one eye is of lesser strength for reading so that I do not have to have reading glasses. Can Lasik be performed to give me the same setup or is it only to achieve 20/20 in both eyes?

- rene

Answer:

Andrew Caster, MD, FACS - LocateADoc.com

Lasik can achieve monovision, just like contact lenses. Andrew Caster, MD castervision.com

--Andrew Caster, MD, FACS
Beverly Hills, California



Dec
2001

Q&A: Could I be a candidate for LASIK eye surgery and is it permanent if I have astigmatism, had brain surgery and my vision is constantly changing?

Question:

I was diagnosed with astigmatism as a pre-schooler. Over the years my vision has deteriorated to the point of constantly requiring the use lens. I also, had an aneurysm 2 1/2 years ago, requiring brain surgery. My questions: 1) Could I possibly be a candidate for lasik eye surgery. 2) Does lasik eye surgery permanently correct vision, or might it periodically need to be repeated?

- Bernistine

Answer:

Andrew Caster, MD, FACS - LocateADoc.com

Your aneurysm surgery should have nothing to do with lasik, though I would make sure that the visual field is normal. It your eye is undergoing a naturally occurring change over time, lasik will not stop that from occurring. However, the change created by lasik is permanent. Andrew Caster, MD castervision.com

--Andrew Caster, MD, FACS
Beverly Hills, California



Nov
2001

Q&A: If I get laser surgery to correct my myopia and astigmatism, will I have increased night vision and sensitivity to glare issues?

Question:

I am interested in laser surgery as I have both myopia and astigmatism, and am unhappy with the amount of correction I get with glasses. However I have read that poor night vision and sensitivity to glare are side effects of laser surgery. I already am quite sensitive to bright lights and have always had poor night vision. Would laser surgery make this situation even worse?

- Paul

Answer:

Richard W Lomas, M.D. - LocateADoc.com

Bear in mind that LASIK cannot be expected to give you better acuity than can be achieved with glasses or contact lenses. Realistic expectations are essential to a happy outcome. Having an evaluation with a LASIK surgeon could give you a more definitive answer.

--Richard W Lomas, M.D.
Renton, Washington



Nov
2001

Q&A: I went to see a new doctor and found that the lens that were prescribed were too steep and were very sharp. as a result it caused my right eye to become a little worse. Can I still go through lasik after that has happened?

Question:

About one year ago I decided to get gas perm contacts. Because I read it is like a retainer and sometimes helps your eyes. I went for many fittings. The last fitting the doctor told me that there may be a bit of discomfort at first that I needed to get use to them. Months pasted, they still we very uncomfotable. I went to see a new doctor and found that the lens that were prescribed were too steep and were very sharp. as a result it caused my right eye to become a little worse. My new doctor found this to be unfortunate and said it may be able to be corrected. My fear is that I may not be a canidate for lasik because of it. Can I still go through lasik after that has happened?

- Rutha

Answer:

Richard W Lomas, M.D. - LocateADoc.com

The nice thing about the human cornea is that it is very resiliant. Before our patients have their LASIK evaluations we require them to be out of gas permeable contact lenses entirely for three weeks. This is plenty of time for the cornea to resume it's natural shape, so you needn't worry. Measuring the cornea in it's natural state is essential to a good LASIK outcome. A word of caution though; please be sure you are choosing a doctor and clinic that have a long history and good reputation in your community. Many LASIK clinics have gone out of business since the first of the year, many patients who paid for LASIK in advance got neither surgery nor refunds! The people who ran some of these defunct clinics are already opening up in new locations under other names. A Dr. who has demonstrated a firm commitment to his/her community for many years is far more likely to still be there when you need him/her.

--Richard W Lomas, M.D.
Renton, Washington



Nov
2001

Q&A: I work as a firefighter and was wondering how IOL could affect me performing my duties and if the heat could affect the lenses inside my eye?

Question:

Iwork as a Firefighter. how a IOL can affect me while Iam performing my duties . and how the Heat can affect the lenses inside my eye.

- marco

Answer:

Richard W Lomas, M.D. - LocateADoc.com

IOL's will be no more affected by your work than your natural lenses would be. IOL's are placed inside the eye where you will not see or feel them. It would require a pretty severe trauma to the eye to affect them. I wonder why you are considering IOL's at all, given your age. Intra-ocular Lens Implants are used for correcting cataracts, which are rare in young people. They are occasionally used to correct extreme prescriptions that are beyond the range of LASIK. The fact that you qualified to be a firefighter tells me that you do not fall into the second catagory. Because IOL's mean loss of close vision, and dependance on reading glasses, we do not recommend them for people under 40 except in the case of cataracts.

--Richard W Lomas, M.D.
Renton, Washington



Nov
2001

Q&A: Would I be a candidate for LASIK eye surgery if I have dry eye (and is this an early form of macular degeneration)?

Question:

Would you still be a good candidate for lasik sugery if you had dry eye,an early form of macular degeneration I believe ?

- Katherine

Answer:

Richard W Lomas, M.D. - LocateADoc.com

Macular degeneration is a disease of the aging retina,very rare in young people, and is unrelated to "dry eye". Dry eye has to do with tear production. Many people choose to have LASIK because their eyes become too dry to wear contact lenses comfortably. Your doctor can determine whether you hav clinically dry eyes, which may require special consideration when contemplating LASIK.

--Richard W Lomas, M.D.
Renton, Washington



Nov
2001

Q&A: How would an IOL (intraocular lens implant) affect me as a firefighter?

Question:

I work as a firefighter how a IOL can affect me. while Iam performing my duties

- marco

Answer:

Richard W Lomas, M.D. - LocateADoc.com

An IOL (intraocular lens implant) is used to resolve cataracts or, in rare cases, to correct vision for someone whose myopia or hyperopia is so extreme as to preclude them from having a LASIK procedure. We have performed over 10,000 IOL procedures for both cataract and refractive corrections. However LASIK can correct nearly any prescription today- up to -16.00 diopters of myopia (nearsightedness), +5.00 diopters of hyperopia(farsightedness), and 5.00 diopters of astigmatism; therefore IOL's for vision correction are seldom used. This procedure involves removing the natural lens of the eye, and replacing it with an artificial lens. If you have a cataract, the alternative is to do nothing...in which case the cataract will certainly worsen until vision is lost. Surgery is pretty much a necessity for cataract patients. Removing the natural lens also removes the ability to change focus from distance to near vision, and the patient would require glasses for all close, and possibly midrange tasks. For this reason we do not recommend implants as refractive devices (to eliminate glasses) on those who are under 40. People who are much over 40 will already suffer loss of close vision that comes naturally with age (presbyopia) and would require reading glasses anyway. LASIK is generally considered the better option for surgical vision correction (in non-cataract patients) when it is possible, as IOL surgery is much more invasive, somewhat more risky, and a great deal more costly. If you have been advised to have lens implants for refractive correction, I strongly urge you to get a second opinion to insure that this is your only option. If you are in Washington, I invite you to come for a free evaluation, we will be happy to clarify what your options are. As far as the effect on your work, the IOL may cause some reflections, especially at night. a few people experience this and find it annoying, most do not notice it. Because the IOL is inside the eye, you will not see or feel it, nor should it affect your ability to do any task with the exception of close work for which you would need reading glasses.

--Richard W Lomas, M.D.
Renton, Washington



Nov
2001

Q&A: Should I wait for a larger laser since my pupil size is 8.5 mm and my current doctor's laser is only 6.5 mm?

Question:

I was recently evaluated for Lasik surgery, and was told that my pupil size is 8.5 mm, whereas the laser is only 6.5 mm. The doctor told me about a larger laser that is supposed to come out soon that can treat my whole pupil instead of just the center, and he recommended that I wait for it. How sure is it that this laser will be coming out soon, and how safe will it be? Will the doctors need retraining on a larger laser? How large will the new laser diameter be? Also, how bad would my night vision be if i did not wait for the new laser? My doctor said that I might be affected more than just halos and starbursts because of how large my pupils are. Would i be able to drive at night without glasses?

- Michelle

Answer 1:

Richard W Lomas, M.D. - LocateADoc.com

You may wish to first have the measurement performed by a second clinic, to insure accuracy. Pupils so large are uncommon, and we frequently see patients who've been told they have exceedingly large pupils, (or exceptionally thin corneas) only to discover they were measured innacurately. Our Nidek scanning laser has larger than average treatment zone, we've had no night glare problems among our patients.

--Richard W Lomas, M.D.
Renton, Washington

Answer 2:

Andrew Caster, MD, FACS - LocateADoc.com

The Autonomous LADARVision laser (which is already available) is able to perform treatments 8.0 by 10.0 mm in size, which is fine for your situation. Andrew Caster, MD

--Andrew Caster, MD, FACS
Beverly Hills, California