LASIK Eye Surgery Questions and Answers Archive

Jul
2000

Q&A: Do less expensive lasik procedures mean a lower quality in vision correction or is it the same as a more expensive procedure? What price can I expect to pay?

Question:

Do less expensive lasik procedures mean lower quality in vision correction or is it the same as a more expensive procedure? What price range is reasonable?

- Denise

Answer 1:

 Byron Stratas, M.D., F.A.C.S. - LocateADoc.com

Price is not the issue. Quality and an excellent track record are more important. You can get an excellent surgeon in the $1500 price range. This should include all your follow up for one year and any enhancements for two years. Prices much lower than this are usually loss leaders or are a red flag for questionable medical practices.

-- Byron Stratas, M.D., F.A.C.S.
Wilmington, North Carolina

Answer 2:

Calvin Sprik, M.D. - LocateADoc.com

Less expensive does not mean lower quality. Don't base everything on cost though. research your local doctors, and choose which is best for you, and which doctor you feel most comfortable with. as for reasonable, national average is around $2,400.00.

--Calvin Sprik, M.D.
Stevens Point, Wisconsin



Jun
2000

Q&A: Can a blow to the face/head cause permanent damage to an eye treated for LASIK eye surgery?

Question:

I am a police officer and am interested in Lasik Surgery. Is it true that if I should suffer from a blow to the head/face that it would cause permanant damage to the eye because of the Lasik procedure?

- Peter

Answer:

Andrew Caster, MD, FACS - LocateADoc.com

LASIK does not weaken the eye, though the older RK surgery certain does. It is possible to move the flap if it is hit directly even several months later. This would cause a sudden blurriness of vision and your doctor would have to smooth the flap. Andrew Caster, MD

--Andrew Caster, MD, FACS
Beverly Hills, California



Jun
2000

Q&A: I have a lazy eye and was wondering what could be done to correct it and if I could also have LASIK done?

Question:

I have a lazy eye, i am wondering what can be done to fix this problem? Is there a problem with having lasik done, having that problem?

- mike

Answer:

Andrew Caster, MD, FACS - LocateADoc.com

You need to see an ophthalmologist to assess the situation. Usually, nothing can be done to correct a lazy eye, but your exact situation needs to be assessed. LASIK can be performed on lazy eyes, but if the laziness is severe, it may not be a good idea to have LASIK on either eye. Andrew Caster, MD

--Andrew Caster, MD, FACS
Beverly Hills, California



Apr
2000

Q&A: Can I still have LASIK eye surgery performed if I have large pupils?

Question:

If I have large pupils can I still have the LASIK procedure?

- Michele

Answer:

Andrew Caster, MD, FACS - LocateADoc.com

Dear Michele, It depends on how large your pupils are, which laser is being used, and which software is used with the laser. Andrew Caster, MD

--Andrew Caster, MD, FACS
Beverly Hills, California



Mar
2000

Q&A: What questions should I ask during my consultation for LASIK eye surgery?

Question:

I am seriously considering LASIK surgery. What do I need to know before my consultation and what smart questions should I ask the doctor. Thank you.

- Duane

Answer:

Calvin Sprik, M.D. - LocateADoc.com

The first thing that you need to keep in mind is that you should not price shop when considering LASIK. Granted that some places are cheaper than others, but this should not be your primary concern. You should research your doctor. This is the most important thing you can do. How many eyes has he/she done? What kind of outcomes does the doctor have? These are two very important questions to ask. Go to the website listed below, and you can view many more questions that you can ask your doctor. http://209.157.186.247/faq/tough_questions.htm

--Calvin Sprik, M.D.
Stevens Point, Wisconsin



Mar
2000

Q&A: Is it safe to have the lasik surgery while taking St John's Wort?

Question:

Is it safe to have the lasik surgery while taking St John's Wort? This herb is known to cause photosensitivity and I have read that its important to avoid exposure to the sun and ultraviolet light while taking it. If one must go off this herb in order to have the surgery, how long until it's completely out of the body and no threat during surgery?

- gina

Answer:

Calvin Sprik, M.D. - LocateADoc.com

During LASIK, an excimer laser is used to treat the cornea. The light produced by the laser is ultraviolet light, and it has a wavelength of 193 nanometers. The laser beam does not penetrate past the cornea, so you don't have to worry about excessive amounts of UV light on the retina. You do not have to discontinue this herb in order to have LASIK surgery.

--Calvin Sprik, M.D.
Stevens Point, Wisconsin



Mar
2000

Q&A: How soon after LASIK will I know what my corrected vision will be?

Question:

How soon will I know what my corrected vision will be after lasik?

- Candi

Answer:

Andrew Caster, MD, FACS - LocateADoc.com

Although the vision will often be quite sharp even the first day after LASIK, it takes about three months to reach your final uncorrected and corrected vision. Andrew Caster, MD

--Andrew Caster, MD, FACS
Beverly Hills, California



Feb
2000

Q&A: Am I a candidate for LASIK eye surgery if I am -3.75 / -4.75 myopia and -3.75 astigmatism and will I have night vision problems?

Question:

My prescription is -3.75 and -4.75 myopia and -3.75 astigmatism. My pupils were 4 mm at my last eye exam and dilation. I am scheduled for Lasik on a Chiron Technolas 217. Am I a good candidate for Lasik? Is it likely that I will experience all of the night time vision problems (haloes and starburts). Also what is the likelihood I would experience wrinkles, islands and dry eyes? All of this is assuming that my cornea is not thin and my eyes are otherwise healthy. Thanks for your help. Cynthia

Answer:

Byron Stratas, M.D., F.A.C.S. - LocateADoc.com

The information you provided appears to indicate you are a good candidate. The risk of significant nightime visual problems is low. However, the important pupil size is that measured in dim illumination. It should not exceed 6-7 mm. The risk of significant dry eyes goes up with: a) past history of dry eyes with or without contacts, b) age > 40, and c) with certain medications.

--Byron Stratas, M.D., F.A.C.S.
Wilmington, North Carolina



Feb
2000

Q&A: How big is too big for pupil size and good results with lasik?

Question:

How big is too big for pupil size and good results with lasik? My Rx is -4.

- Sandy

Answer:

Alexandra Christine Chebil, MD, FRCSC - LocateADoc.com

Dear Sandy, The pupil size is not the only factor for success after Lasik. If you are mainly concerned about "glare" at night, then light colored eyes, large pupils and small treatment area are also factors. A -4 Rx is not too high to cause concern. In general a pupil larger than 6mm could cause more glare especially if a small treatment area is used. Your doctor should be able to explain this. Sincerely, Dr. Alexandra Chebil M.D. The Lasik Center

--Alexandra Christine Chebil, MD, FRCSC
Irvine, California



Feb
2000

Q&A: Is there published information on the safety, effectiveness and qualification requirements of Canadian versus US LASIK eye surgeons?

Question:

My wife is considering traveling from Seattle to Vancouver, BC for lasik surgery. Do you know of any specific resources where I can find statistics on the safety and effectiveness of the procedure in Canada versus the US? Do doctors in Canada have to have the same qualifications as doctors in the US?

- James

Answer:

Calvin Sprik, M.D. - LocateADoc.com

You have entered an area where it will be hard to compare apples to apples so to speak. Inportant things to ask about are experience ( more than 300 cases done), size of the optical zone of treatment( I have seen 5.5 mm patients from Canada. We use 6.5 in the USA...smaller is likely to produce more haloes at night.). In the USA, the FDA dictates what type of eyes we can operate on. There is nothing regulated in Canada, so many patients who are pushing the limit would be operated there, while here in the USA, they would not be considered good candidates. Some doctors in Canada have done LASIK for years, as have some in the USA. Others there and here have just started, and have limited experience. That is why you need to ask those questions. One more point for your wife: you will have no legal recourse as a USA citizen in Canada if the issue of Malpractice arises. My advice for my patients is to consider this, and the fact that they will have to return to Canada for enhancements, complication management, and possibly followup care. What do those trips cost in terms of time off of work, mileage, hotels, etc. Go to www.isrs.org for a site with good information. Thanks

--Calvin Sprik, M.D.
Stevens Point, Wisconsin