In Vitro Fertilization (IVF) Questions and Answers Archive

Nov
2000

Q&A: What are my option to have a child if I had tubal ligation 13 years ago?

Question:

I had a tubal ligation 13 yrs. ago after my son was born. I am 43 and my husband now is 24. We would like to have a baby of our own and would like to know what our options are, the approximate cost, and where we can find someone close by.

- Renita

Answer:

 Daniel Potter, MD, FACOG - LocateADoc.com

In vitro fertilization with donor eggs would be your best option. www.asrm.org will give you names of fertility specialists in your area

-- Daniel Potter, MD, FACOG
Fullerton, California



Oct
2000

Q&A: What can be done if my husband does not appear to be producing sperm?

Question:

My husband is being referred to a urologist as 2 sperm analysis tests have come back with no sperm present. What will the urologist be able to tell about this problem? My husband had an infection in his testicles when he was 14 he is now 36. Our doctor think this infection may have damaged his tubes that is why he is now to see a urologist. What are our chances of him producing sperm but not ejaculating it and if so will the option of taking sperm direct form his testes be an option?

- amanda

Answer:

Daniel Potter, MD, FACOG - LocateADoc.com

THe urologist will perform a physical exam and order hormonal tests. If the tests and physical exam indicate that the testicle is healthy, a testicular biopsy might be perfromed to see if sperm are being made. If sperm are beng made, these sperm can be injected into your eggs at the time of in vitro fertilization with the chances for success depending on the age of the female partner and how well her ovaries are functioning. Daniel A. Potter MD Huntington Reproductive Center HTTP://www.havingbabies.com

--Daniel Potter, MD, FACOG
Fullerton, California



Sep
2000

Q&A: I want to get pregnant but I have no fallopian tubes. Can I have them put in or undergo a fertilization technique?

Question:

Hello! I need to find out if I need an infertility specialist or a reconstructive surgeon. I contracted chlamydia when I was in college from an unfaithful boyfriend. Since then, I have had 2 ectopic pregnancies & both of my fallopian tubes have been removed. When I read info on infertility it doesn't seem to fit me. I don't seem to fall into any of the categories being discussed on infertility issues. I guess I am fertile, but I don't have any tubes to get my husband's sperm where it needs to go. Would a reconstructive surgeon be able to replace my fallopian tubes? Sincerely, Desperately seeking a baby

- Nya

Answer:

SCOTT ROSEFF, MD, FACOG, Director - LocateADoc.com

Sorry, no one can replace human (or otherwise) fallopian tubes yet. Without tubes, your only option for achieving a pregnancy is via in-vitro fertilization (IVF). I hope this is pretty clear to you. If I can be of further help to you, please let me know. Dr. Roseff Visit us at http://www.reproendo.com

--SCOTT ROSEFF, MD, FACOG, Director
West Orange, New Jersey



Jul
2000

Q&A: What is the cost of in vitro fertilization?

Question:

Invitro fertilization can be expensive, right? Would you happen to have a figure amount? Also, would you know of a doctor in my area that would do this procedure? My husband and I do not have children, although I have two children from a previous marriage, and my husband has no children and had never been married before. So, if invitro is the best way for us to go then we'll go there but we'd like to know what we'll be getting into financially, the love is already there. Please reply A.S.A.P. Time is not on our side. Thank you, Janet and Jeff Bright.

Answer:

Daniel Potter, MD, FACOG - LocateADoc.com

The cost of IVF varies from region to region. The total cost, including compensation paid to the donor, fees paid to donor agency, medications, etc approaches $15,000 in our area. To find a reproductive endocrinologist in your area that offers these services, contact either RESOLVE (Resolve.org) or American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM.org)

--Daniel Potter, MD, FACOG
Fullerton, California



Jul
2000

Q&A: Should a 44 year old women undergo tubal ligation or in vitro fertilization to have a baby if she has a genetic disorder?

Question:

is there anything that can be done to undo a tubaligation? Is it recommended for a woman age 44, also there is a genetic disorder involved in my case. Would it be advisable for me to pursue a pregnancy now?

- janet

Answer:

Daniel Potter, MD, FACOG - LocateADoc.com

Tubal ligation can be reversed sugically or bypassed with in vitro fertilization. It would be unwised to attempt either of these procedures in a 44 year old woman as success is unlikely. If you wish to have a child, in vitro fertilization using eggs from a donor would allow you to carry the child but have a much better chance for success. You would also avoid passing on any genetic problems that you may carry. Daniel A Potter MD Huntington Reproductive Center Fullerton/Laguna Hills CA www.havingbabies.com

--Daniel Potter, MD, FACOG
Fullerton, California



Nov
2000

Q&A: What are my options in having a baby if I want to leave by tubes tied?

Question:

i've had a tubal ligation for approx. 6 years and want to know what my options are for conceiving while leaving my tubes tied?

- lee

Answer:

Daniel Potter, MD, FACOG - LocateADoc.com

In vitro fertilization is your only option aside from having your tubes surgically repaired. Daniel A. Potter, MD Huntington Reproductive Center www.havingbabies.com

--Daniel Potter, MD, FACOG
Fullerton, California



Apr
2000

Q&A: How do I have another child and ensure it is a girl to avoid x-linked retinal degeneration being passed on?

Question:

I am a female with a family history of x-linked retinal degeneration. I have a son that inherited some of these problems. The severity of his problem is not yet known since he is only 9. I would like another child but I would need to have a girl to avoid this being inherited. What steps should I take to look into this and is it actually possible to select the gender of a child?

- concerned

Answer:

Daniel Potter, MD, FACOG - LocateADoc.com

There are a couple of way to approach this problem. One of them is to have inseminations with your husbands sperm after it has been processed to increase the number of 'X' bearing sperm (therefore increasing the likelyhood ofhaving a girl). This would be followed by a chorionic villus sampling procedure at about 10-11 weeks to determine the sex. If it is a male, you would have the option of terminating the pregnancy. A second option would be to have in vitro fertilization done with preimplantation genetic diagnosis. In this process, we would create embryos through in vitro fertilization, then do a test on the embryos to determine the sex prior to transfering the embryos. THis would eliminate the possible need for abortion, but is more costly. The second procedure is available only at select centers across the USA (including my own). If you would like more information, call (714)738-4200. Good luck.

--Daniel Potter, MD, FACOG
Fullerton, California



Nov
1999

Q&A: What kind of fertilization will get me pregnant if my husbands sperm count is low and I have has two therapeutic abortions?

Question:

presently I am 42 years old and 8 months. i am a member of Kaiser permanente. My partner is 57 years old and has been on anti-deppresants for ten years. He has a very low sperm count. I have a normal period every 28 days and I am in good health. i have two daughters 13 and 16 and I have been pregnant a total of four times. The first two pregnancies were was when I was 20 and 21 years old, which resulted in a therapeutic abortion. I would very much like to get pregnant, what kind of fertilization methods would you recommend for me and my partner real soon. He had a son when he was 28 years old and would be happy to get involved in some kind of procedure that would result in a birth of a baby.

- sabela

Answer:

Daniel Potter, MD, FACOG - LocateADoc.com

You will need in vitro fertilization if your husband has a low sperm count. The real question is going to be whether your ovaries are functioning well enough to do in vitro with your eggs or whether you will need an egg donor. An FSH and estradiol level on the 3rd day of your next period will let your doctor know how well your ovaries are functioning. See a fertility specialist right away. I would be happy to recommend one in your area.

--Daniel Potter, MD, FACOG
Fullerton, California



Oct
1999

Q&A: Would the Direct Oocyte-Sperm Transfer (D.O.S.T) procedure be a better alternative to tubal ligation reversal?

Question:

Where can I find out about the D.O.S.T. (direct Oocyte-Sperm Transferr ) procedure and what Dr.'s are doing this procedure in my area. I have had my tubes tied but would like to have another baby and am considering this procedure because I feel it is the least invasive. Would this be a viable alternative to a reversal and what are the success rates at this point? Thank you for answering as many questions as possible on this subject.

- melanie

Answer:

Daniel Potter, MD, FACOG - LocateADoc.com

There is no advantage to this procedure over in vitro fertilization. It is equally invasive and carries the same risks but has a much lower pregnancy rate. You should have in vitro fertilization or have your tubes reversed. Reversing your tubes would mean major surgery and the need for future contraception. IVF is probably the way to go.

--Daniel Potter, MD, FACOG
Fullerton, California



Sep
1999

Q&A: Could a detached tube be keeping me from getting pregnant and can I get it reattached?

Question:

About 9 years ago I had a corneal tubal pregnancy which resulted in surgery. I am having trouble getting pregnant. Can that tube be reattached? Also I am 36 years old. I have a son that was born 10 years ago. Any suggestions on how to proceed? I would like to have at least 2 more children but was told that I would have to have Cesareans because of the scar tissue on my uterus. My son was also cesearan.

- Anita

Answer:

Daniel Potter, MD, FACOG - LocateADoc.com

See a fertility specialist. Your other tube is probably damaged as well. Reattaching the tube is not really done anymore. You probably need IVF (in vitro fertilization)

--Daniel Potter, MD, FACOG
Fullerton, California